20 Woven Fabric Defects with Pictures

By | March 26, 2016

20 Woven Fabric Defects with Pictures

Mayedul Islam
Merchandiser at Fashion Xpress Buying House.
Badda, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Email: mayedul.islam66@gmail.com

 

Woven Fabric Defects and Their Images:

In textile industry, woven fabric is produced by interlacing warp and weft yarn. Faulty woven fabrics hampers the total quality of woven garments such as shirt, pant, trouser, jacket etc. As a textile engineer you should know about the major woven fabric faults which produced during woven fabric manufacturing. As its importance this article has shown those woven fabric faults with their images.

You may follow Apparel Checking Methods | Quality Checking List of Apparel Industry

Major Defects Found in Woven Fabrics:

Various types of faults found in woven fabrics has mentioned in the below:

  1. Bad selvedge,
  2. Broken ends or warp,
  3. Broken picks or weft,
  4. Loose warp,
  5. Loose weft or snarl,
  6. Double end,
  7. Tight end,
  8. Float of warp,
  9. Wrong end color,
  10. Miss pick,
  11. Double pick,
  12. Weft bar,
  13. Ball,
  14. Hole,
  15. Oil spot,
  16. Tails out,
  17. Temple mark,
  18. Reed mark,
  19. Slub,
  20. Thick and thin place.

All the above woven fabrics faults have explained in the following:

1. Bad or defective selvedge:

Bad selvedge in woven fabrics due to the faulty weaving. Here, warp ends being set too far apart for the thickness of the yarn or in finished fabric.

Defective selvage in fabric

Defective selvage in fabric

2. Broken ends or warp:

A defect in the woven fabrics caused by a warp yarn that was broken during weaving or finishing.

Broken ends

Broken ends

3. Broken picks or weft:

A filling yarn that is broken in the weaving of fabric.

Broken picks

Broken picks

4. Loose warp:

This type of fault is produced in woven fabrics when the tension of warp yarn is slow.

Loose-warp

Loose-warp

5. Loose weft or snarl:

It is produced in woven fabrics due to the looseness of filling yarn.

Loose weft or snarl

Loose weft or snarl

6. Double ends:

This kind of fault is produced in woven fabrics when the two ends of warp sticks get together after sizing.

Double ends

Double ends

7. Tight ends:

If the tension of warp yarn is more than the other ends present in the loom then this type of fault is produced in woven fabrics.

Tight ends

Tight ends

8. Float of warp:

If someone pulls the fabric together the cloth roller intentionally or unintentionally then this kind of defect is produced in woven fabrics.

Float of warp

Float of warp

9. Wrong end color:

It is produced in woven fabric due to the wrong drawing of colored yarn.

Wrong end color

Wrong end color

10. Miss pick:

This kind of defect is produced in woven fabric when operator starts a stopped machine without picking the broken weft from the shade.

Miss pick

Miss pick

11. Double pick:

It is produced in woven fabric when the cutter don’t work properly.

Double picks

Double picks

12. Weft bar:

When count of yarn varies from one cone to another cone then a bar of weft will be appeared in fabric after weaving.

Weft bar

Weft bar

13. Ball:

If the warp is too much hairy then the reed will create ball in warp yarn in between reed and heald shaft. If the ball is small enough to pass through the dent of reed then those will form the ball in fabric.

Ball

Ball

14. Hole:

A fabric imperfection in which one or several yarns are sufficiently damaged to create an opening.

Hole

Hole

15. Oil spot or stain:

Discoloration on a local area of a substrate that may be resistant to remove by laundering or dry cleaning. It occurs during spinning, weaving or finishing. It is also often seen in the woven fabric. It is also produced in woven fabric if too much oiling has done on the loom parts.

Oil spot

Oil spot

16. Tails out:

This kind of fault is produced in woven fabric if the cutter doesn’t work properly.

Tails out

Tails out

17. Temple mark:

If the placement of ring in the temple bar is wrong or the pressure of temple to the fabrics is too high then this type of fault is produced.

Temple mark in woven fabric

Temple mark

18. Reed mark:

In woven fabric, a crack between the groups of warp ends either continuous or at intervals. It’s may be caused by the wrong drawing-in of the warp or damage to the reed wires.

Reed mark in woven fabric

Reed mark in woven fabric

19. Slub:

If the yarn contains unexpected slub in it then those slub will be appeared in the fabric as a fault.

Slub in woven fabric

Slub

20. Thick and thin place:

Fabric defect in which fabric count varies more than a specified percentage from the intended count. If the thick or thin place is more than one inch (2.54cm) wide then it is considered as a major defect in fabric grading.

Thick and thin place in woven fabric

Thick and thin place

A segment of yarn at least ¼ inch (0.6cm) long that is noticeably thicker than adjacent portions of yarn is called thick place. A segment of yarn at least 25% smaller in diameter than adjacent portions of yarn is called thin place.

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16 thoughts on “20 Woven Fabric Defects with Pictures

  1. Subhasish Banerjee

    Being Textile Professional, I appreciate such study and sharing Fabric damages. It would be very useful for shopfloor people in Manufacturing in understanding such damages cause loss in Gaments. Process control, Machines auditing and checking from time to time also training to Weaver for avoiding such damages during operation.
    Damage control is the topmost priority and means of cost cutting.

    Inspection should be just checking and packing than counting points and decision making whether Fresh packing is above 98% and customer need not to worry for any rejection at their end.

    Reply
  2. Shyam Sunder Bali

    Nice study done and presented in a nice format so that a person can learn also fro it.

    Reply
  3. Repunjay singh

    Good eaisly to understand………………..

    warm regards

    Reply
  4. Md. Golam Kibriya

    It is very helpful for us who are working taking garments. Next we want more such as post. Thank you so much.Thanks all.

    Reply
  5. Eduardo

    Nice description, thanks! I am working on image processing and I want to detect all these kinds of defects, but my dataset is too bad. Do you have any picture that you can give me?
    Thanks a lot!

    Reply

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